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SPAC Frequently Asked Questions

A Special Purpose Acquisition Company, or SPAC, is a publicly traded investment vehicle where a management team raises capital in an IPO for the express purpose of making an acquisition. Also known as a “blank check” company, US-listed SPACs will typically grant management an 18-24 month period in which to either complete an acquisition or return capital to shareholders. IPO proceeds are kept in a segregated trust account, and investors can choose to redeem their shares for a pro rata share of the trust account if they do not wish to own the new company.

To learn more about SPACs in general, please visit the following resources:

A Special Purpose Acquisition Company, or SPAC, is a publicly traded investment vehicle where a management team raises capital in an IPO for the express purpose of making an acquisition. Also known as a “blank check” company, US-listed SPACs will typically grant management an 18-24 month period in which to either complete an acquisition or return capital to shareholders. IPO proceeds are kept in a segregated trust account, and investors can choose to redeem their shares for a pro rata share of the trust account if they do not wish to own the new company.

To learn more about SPACs in general, please visit the following resources:

A Special Purpose Acquisition Company, or SPAC, is a publicly traded investment vehicle where a management team raises capital in an IPO for the express purpose of making an acquisition. Also known as a “blank check” company, US-listed SPACs will typically grant management an 18-24 month period in which to either complete an acquisition or return capital to shareholders. IPO proceeds are kept in a segregated trust account, and investors can choose to redeem their shares for a pro rata share of the trust account if they do not wish to own the new company.

To learn more about SPACs in general, please visit the following resources:

A Special Purpose Acquisition Company, or SPAC, is a publicly traded investment vehicle where a management team raises capital in an IPO for the express purpose of making an acquisition. Also known as a “blank check” company, US-listed SPACs will typically grant management an 18-24 month period in which to either complete an acquisition or return capital to shareholders. IPO proceeds are kept in a segregated trust account, and investors can choose to redeem their shares for a pro rata share of the trust account if they do not wish to own the new company.

To learn more about SPACs in general, please visit the following resources:

A Special Purpose Acquisition Company, or SPAC, is a publicly traded investment vehicle where a management team raises capital in an IPO for the express purpose of making an acquisition. Also known as a “blank check” company, US-listed SPACs will typically grant management an 18-24 month period in which to either complete an acquisition or return capital to shareholders. IPO proceeds are kept in a segregated trust account, and investors can choose to redeem their shares for a pro rata share of the trust account if they do not wish to own the new company.

To learn more about SPACs in general, please visit the following resources:

A Special Purpose Acquisition Company, or SPAC, is a publicly traded investment vehicle where a management team raises capital in an IPO for the express purpose of making an acquisition. Also known as a “blank check” company, US-listed SPACs will typically grant management an 18-24 month period in which to either complete an acquisition or return capital to shareholders. IPO proceeds are kept in a segregated trust account, and investors can choose to redeem their shares for a pro rata share of the trust account if they do not wish to own the new company.

To learn more about SPACs in general, please visit the following resources:

A Special Purpose Acquisition Company, or SPAC, is a publicly traded investment vehicle where a management team raises capital in an IPO for the express purpose of making an acquisition. Also known as a “blank check” company, US-listed SPACs will typically grant management an 18-24 month period in which to either complete an acquisition or return capital to shareholders. IPO proceeds are kept in a segregated trust account, and investors can choose to redeem their shares for a pro rata share of the trust account if they do not wish to own the new company.

To learn more about SPACs in general, please visit the following resources: